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The Long View: Brass

25 July 2012 3 Comments

The Long View

 

In this episode of The Long View, we take a closer look at the game Brass with Justin Nordstrom and Jesse Dean. We try to answer what makes this game so different and unique from other economic games, and try to answer the question, “What makes a Wallace, a Wallace?”

Thanks to 2d6.org for hosting, and thank you for listening!

~ Geof Gambill

 

 

The Long View: Brass

Geof Gambill
View all posts by Geof Gambill
Geofs website
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User Review:
Rating: 4.3/5 (7 votes cast)
The Long View: Brass, 4.3 out of 5 based on 7 ratings

3 Comments »

  • Geof Gambill said:

    Hello out there!

    This is the second episode where I have noticed a pattern. The first two ratings of the show being 5′s, then a sudden dip to 3.7 (3.66 rounded up to 3.7) after a third vote. This requires a vote of one out of five stars to bring the average down to this (5+5+1=11/3 = 3.66). Now I don’t mind if some do not care for what I am trying to do in and for the community, but a one is a very harsh rating. I would honestly like to know what feedback my raters would have so I know what they like and dislike about the show. A five or four to me says, “carry on, nice job”, and so specific feedback is not really needed, though it is always really appreciated. A one, however, seems to indicate active dislike for the show or episode. I would appreciate knowing what you do not care for. I am by no means an expert, and so know there is always room for growth. Thanks for your time.

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  • Chris said:

    Hiya. I wasn’t one of the earlier raters, but I thought I’d stop by and say I’m enjoying the podcast (I’ve recently started listening from episode one, but also to quibble:

    Jesse Dean, who was brought in as the nominal Brass expert, explained the Birkenhead rule exactly backwards. The Birkenhead link counts as a constructed rail link for all players for purposes of determining where you can build things (e.g. if you have an industry in Liverpool, you can build in Birkenhead with a ship card if you can supply the coal). It very explicitly does *not* count as a way to move coal, which is why Birkenhead cannot be used until the rail phase (since there is no canal into Birkenhead, there is no way to get coal there until the rail phase).

    In most reviews or podcasts, I wouldn’t even notice this. However, in this one you are explicitly bringing in experts to analyze the game in depth – as a Brass enthusiast I probably wouldn’t bother listening to a review of Brass, but I listened to this because I thought I could get something out of it. Given the mission statement of the podcast, I found it unsettling that the person who was supposed to be the expert had an (admittedly weird) rule totally wrong (even more surprising since he played so much on order of the hammer where the rule probably would have been apparent the first time you tried to break it).

    Anyway, one giant nitpick aside, I’m enjoying the podcast so far. If you are looking for specific feedback, I’d love it if the podcast were a little more structured from newbie->expert. That is, the podcast would start by explaining the basics of the game and how it works, and move towards not just talking about details, but really talking about strategy. I feel like it gets handwaved into “there are all kinds of interesting strategies” too often, and again, your mission statement implies this level of detail (to me anyway).

    Keep up the good work.

    Chris (cferejohn on Boardgamegeek – the guy who looks like white Mr. T.)

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  • Martin Griffiths said:

    Yeah, that jumped out to me too, I pointed it out to Jesse afterwards :)

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