Tag Archives: card-driven

Gothic Invasion Review

gothic invasion

Gothic Invasion is a card-driven wargame depicting the Gothic Wars from 377 to 382 A.D. Each player takes the roles of the Goth leaders (Fritigern, Alatheus and Saphrax) and the Roman leaders (Valens, Theodosius I, Gratian and Flavius Richomeres). The Goth player’s objective is to plunder nine cities of the East Roman empire between 377-382 A.D., while the Roman player must defend the imperial cities and slow them down as best as he can until the spring of 382 A.D.

Gothic Invasion is a “cat and mouse” tactical defensive game from the Roman point of view while from the Gothic side it’s a “race against time” aggressive war.

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1775: Rebellion Review

1775

The Birth of America series continues with The American Revolution.

In 1775: Rebellion, players take the roles of the American Continental Army and Patriots against the British Army and the Loyalists. Each side tries to control the colonies, provinces and territories. They call on the aid of Native Americans, as well as the German Hessians and French Army in order to successfully birth a revolution or quell the rebellion. The four factions each use their own deck of cards to move their units into postions. Battles are resolved quickly with custom dice. If you can control an entire colony, province or territory you raise a flag. When the game ends with the signing of the Treaty of Paris, the side with the most flag markers is the winner.

1775: Rebellion uses the same basic mechanisms as 1812: The Invasion of Canada, but to a different end result. The game is quicker (being 2-4 player) and the intermingling of units at the beginning of the game allows the action to start immediately. There are a few core rules that changed in order to better portray the goals of the war.

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1775 Rebellion (Video Review)

1775

The Birth of America series continues with The American Revolution.

In 1775: Rebellion, players take the roles of the American Continental Army and Patriots against the British Army and the Loyalists. Each side tries to control the colonies, provinces and territories. They call on the aid of Native Americans, as well as the German Hessians and French Army in order to successfully birth a revolution or quell the rebellion. The four factions each use their own deck of cards to move their units into postions. Battles are resolved quickly with custom dice. If you can control an entire colony, province or territory you raise a flag. When the game ends with the signing of the Treaty of Paris, the side with the most flag markers is the winner.

1775: Rebellion uses the same basic mechanisms as 1812: The Invasion of Canada, but to a different end result. The game is quicker (being 2-4 player) and the intermingling of units at the beginning of the game allows the action to start immediately. There are a few core rules that changed in order to better portray the goals of the war.

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Belisarius’s War (Video Review)

Belisarius's War

The Roman Reconquest of Africa, AD 533-534

In AD 533, Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian began the attempted reconquest of the territories of the fallen Western Empire from the barbarians who overran it the prior century. Leading the first of those campaigns was the great general, Flavius Belisarius. Belisarius’s War is a two-player game of the Vandal War, in which the Eastern Romans reconquered North Africa. One player commands the Romans, the other the Vandals. Both players maneuver units representing elite regulars, tribal warbands, fleets and militia. The point-to-point map covers North Africa as well as the islands of the Western Mediterranean.

In Belisarius’s War each player has a unique deck of Campaign Cards. They generate recruits, movement abilities, special bonuses for combat, and historical events. Some of the cards include: Naval-Land Campaigns, Organize the Exarchate, Ambush, and Procopius.

Combat is resolved via a quasi-tactical procedure. Each side has unique advantages, with fierce Vandals pitted against disciplined Roman heavy cavalry. There are special rules for Huns, rebellions, morale and leaders such as Belisarius. Having the right commander at the right battle can mean the difference between victory and disaster.

~ Decision Games (I)

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Fighting Eagles (A Video Review)

Fighting

Fighting Eagles uses a simple game system to simulate the air battles of 1918 fought between the American and German air forces. Based on Rohrbaugh’s Showtime Hanoi design, players will play head-to-head matches pitting several Allied aircraft vs. their German counterparts.

Allied player wins the game if their German target is destroyed and more German aircraft are destroyed than Allied. Any other result is a German win. If Red Baron (Fokker Dr1) is shot down or leaves the map the best the German can do is tie.

In addition the game will include two historical scenarios: Red Baron’s Last Flight and Frank Luke’s Last Flight and several variants including additional missions of bombing & balloon busting.

Players will need a standard deck of cards and one six-sided die (D6) to play the game.

Each copy of Fighting Eagles is composed of the following:

  • One set of 40 die cut counters
  • One 8.5 by 11 map with the Turn Record Track
  • A set of rules

~ High Flying Dice Games

 

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