Tag Archives: CDG

Bull Moose

Bull Moose

 
(from numbskull games):

Bull Moose is a U. S. presidential election game based on the 1912 election. The split in the Republican party resulted in Teddy Roosevelt launching the Progressive Party. Concurrently the Socialists under Eugene Debs had their best showing to date. The Prohibitionists fielded Eugene Chaffin running only 7 years prior to the passing of the 18th Amendment (prohibition).
This resulted in a 5 way race in which the Democrats actually won and the third party, the Progressives came in second. The election is represented by a straightforward, card driven, geographically based game where the winners of each state are decided by lot. The winning of the election and victory condition criteria is loosely based on the popular vote and not on how the electoral college actually functions.

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Assyrian Wars

Ass War

 

 

This may be the most complex CDG out there. It also has a terrible rulebook in nearly
every way (but especially formatting and drawing ideas together). Bear with me (or
skip ahead), because it looks quite interesting as well.

(from UGG site)

“Peace is not a condition between independent states. Peace is a service that can be bought…for tribute to the Assyrian King”.

As can be seen from the cover the Assyrians were the innovators of siege warfare. All siege techniques like rams, towers, undermining city walls have been developed to mastery by the Assyrians.
Typical Assyrian is the shield bearer with oversize shields protecting the masses of bowmen from enemy fire.

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Turning Point

turnpoint
(from BGG)

Freeman’s Farm and Lundy’s Lane were Turning Points in the American Revolution and the War of 1812 for America in the formation the United States Army.

Using the Battle Manuver system (first seen in Waterloo), this is a low complexity game designed by Richard Berg. It is a full box game.

The Battle Manuver syster game uses cards, one deck for each player (whose cards are somewhat different from those of the other player) to drive the game. Each player gets a certain number of cards each turn – often a different number for each player! – but never his full deck. The cards are used to determine movement, combat, and actions such as Counter-Attack, and Rally, among others. Players may play as many of their cards up to 5 when it’s their turn, using each card for only one of the possible three purposes. Play passes back and forth between players, until both players have used all their cards… and the turn is over.

Turning Point is thus a game of card play and management, which unfolds on the historical battle map – it uses squares, rather than hexes – with the use of some large counters. This is a game of position, feint, and sudden attack with what you hope are better odds (since you don’t know what cards your opponent will play, if any, and you never know what his final strength will be). No dice are used. And there are no CRT’s.

Playing time for each battle is about 2 hours, sometimes less, and the rules are only 8 pages! Balance is excellent, and because of the use of cards and their random distribution each turn, no game is the same as any other. And the game is playable solitaire (with specific rules for doing so).

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Freeman’s Farm:

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1955: The War of Espionage Review

box

 

Minimalist CDG on cold war espionage.

Two players take on the role of Master Spies as they attempt to use their country’s resources to sway the people of six countries into joining their faction.

The two players draw from a communal deck to build their hands in an attempt to create card combinations that will allow the shifting of allegiance in six different countries. Every card may be used offensively, defensively or for a special effect. Careful planning and maneuvering of their master spy pawn results in increased effectiveness of the cards or the ability to trigger an offensive action that catches the opponent off guard.

A game takes between 15 and 30 minutes for experienced players and between 30 and 45 minutes for inexperienced players. The game is marketed for ages 14 and up.

1955: The War of Espionage was released at GenCon 2011 by APE Games and Living Worlds Games.

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