Tag Archives: economic

Blockade Runner

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Blockade Runner is a resource trading game in the Euro style, but with a dash of danger. In Blockade Runner, players take on the roles of entrepreneurs attempting to make the most money by shipping cargo in and out of the South during the American Civil War. Positioning is achieved by competing with each other for access to commodities, top market prices, and newly built ships. Hard decisions include whether to play safely to keep ships afloat or take potentially profitable risks. The crux of the play hinges upon whether to bring in vital war goods, which reduce the intensity of the growing blockade, or more profitable black market goods. This enables a potential for limited cooperation, but competition is the heart of the game.
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Last of the Independents

Last of the Independents

 

 

(from Numbskull)

Last of the Independents is a Euro-style, Americana themed historical simulation game. Set in the post WW2-era, it is as fast paced and cutthroat as the automotive industry itself. Players must design, engineer, and promote cars as they compete against each other, “The Big 3,” and the economy. This is accomplished with a combination of set company profiles, advantageous investment allocation, and clever card play.

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1826

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18xx set in France and Belgium. Nationalized railways, loans, and low initial capitalization
make it sound a lot like ’56, but there are significant differences. For one, the stock market
is less volatile – growth is based upon an earnings requirement. Train efficacy is (at first) based
upon distance rather than cities serviced. There are TWO nationalization options. Electric and
High Speed trains (which don’t worry about the distance factor).

(from deep thought)

1826 is a railroad operations and share trading board game in the 18xx series, set in France and Belgium. It was first published by Chris Lawson in 2000 and then by Deep Thought Games in 2004. As David Hecht’s first design, it is the most conventional, and the only one to use “traditional” green and brown plain track upgrade tiles. 1826 started out as “1830 on a different map”, but rapidly evolved into a game of capital and technology management: the game’s key decisions revolve around when to “grow” a company, and which trains to buy to optimize a company’s final position.
1826 has twelve companies, but only ten can be in play at once: the other two are formed through the merger of distressed companies (as with the CGR in 1856). Most companies start out as “five-share companies”: they effectively pay double dividends per share, but are limited to fewer trains than “ten-share companies”. Each five-share company has a destination (as in 1856) and–once reached–the key decision is when to “grow” the company to ten shares. Growing the company increases its train limit and gives access to more company capital, but effectively halves the dividends per share.

1826’s geography is dominated by two salient features: Paris, which is centrally located and the base station for six of the ten (non-merger) companies, but which never becomes a “through” station; and a substantial asymmetry between the rich north and the poor south. This requires companies to carefully plan what sort of trains to use: at the start of the game, all trains are “hex” trains (counting hexes and scoring all along their path) rather than standard “city” trains (which only count up to a maximum number of cities and towns). However, there are three types of permanent trains: one “hex” and two “city”, one of which has a smaller train number but doubles the value of the cities between which it travels. “Hex” trains are ideal for the densely-populated north while “city” trains are best suited in the less densely-populated south.

1826 is a game of moderate complexity (comparable to 1830 and 1856), and can be played in 4-6 hours by 2-6 experienced players.

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California Gold

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(from numbskull):

historic simulation of orange grove production where you represent a co-op for helping orange ranchers receive support and best prices for their crops. Play hinges around collecting cards that represent orange ranches. Buildings, such as packing houses, and nurseries, create local support structures, while railroad contracts and advertising increase profits. Working conditions, weather and politics compound the challenges.
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