Tag Archives: Francis Tresham

1853 (Video Review)

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This is the Indian sub-continent (British Imperial India) member of the 18xx family of games. It is billed as A game for engineers who’ve had enough of the financiers! It involves five-foot-six and meter gauges, hills, mountains and the Himalayas, contract bids and government mails. The technical challenges of building a railroad network in difficult country stand on a par with the financial market manipulation which usually dominates the 18xx games.

 

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1835 (Video Review)

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This 18xx game takes the basic mechanics from Tresham’s 1829 and adds several new elements. Players seek to make the most money by buying and selling stock in various rail companies located on a German map. The board itself is actually a fairly abstract hexagonal system, with track tiles placed on top of the hexes. Players buy and sell stock in various share companies, whose actions are controlled by the majority stockholder. The stock manipulation aspect of the game is not as brutal as in 1830. Plus each 18xx title adds new and different elements to the game. This game features minor rail companies, layered stock offerings, and the formation of the Prussian railroad from the minor companies. A game is finished when the bank runs out of money, and the player with the greatest personal holdings wins.

~ Mayfair

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Civilization (Video Review)

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CIVILIZATION is a game of skill for 2 to 7 players. It covers the development of ancient civilizations from the invention of agriculture c. 8000 B.C. to the emergence of Rome around the middle of the third century B.C. Each player leads a nation of peoples over a mapboard of the Eastern Mediterranean and Near East as they attempt to carve a niche for themselves and their culture.

Although battles and territorial strategy are important, this is not a war game because it is not won by battle or conquest. Instead, the object of play is to gain a level of overall advancement involving cultural, economic, and political factors so that such conflicts that do arise are a result of rivalry and land shortage rather than a desire to eliminate other players. Nomad and farmer, warrior and merchant, artisan and citizen all have an essential part to play in the development of civilization. It is the player who most effectively changes emphasis between these various outlooks who will achieve the best balance – and win.
~ Avalon Hill 

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1830 (Video Review)

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1830 is one of the most famous 18xx games. One of the things some gamers like about this game is that the game has ‘no chance’ element. That is to say, if players wished to play two games with the same moves, the outcome would be the same also.

This game takes the basic mechanics from Tresham’s 1829, and adds several new elements. Players are seeking to make the most money by buying and selling stock in various share companies located on eastern United States map. The stock manipulation aspect of the game is widely-regarded as one of the best. The board itself is actually a fairly abstract hexagonal system, with track tiles placed on top of the hexes. Plus each 18xx title adds new and different elements to the game. This game features private rail companies and an extremely vicious, ‘robber baron’ oriented stock market. A game is finished when the bank runs out of money or one player is forced to declare bankruptcy, and the player with the greatest personal holdings wins.

The 2011 version of 1830 was published by Mayfair Games in partnership with Lookout Games of Germany. This publication was developed under license from Francis Tresham in co-operation with Bruce Shelly (the original 1830 developer). This version contains rules and components for Francis Tresham’s original classic design, a faster-playing basic game, and new variants from some of the world’s best railroad game developers.

 

~ Avalon Hill/ Mayfair Games

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Revolution: The Dutch Revolt 1568-1648 (Review & Play through)

Revolution: The Dutch Revolt simulates the Eighty Years’ War between Spain and the Netherlands. This epic struggle lasted from 1568 until 1648 and eventually brought independence to Holland and the northern provinces. In the south, the revolt was less successful and Belgium did not emerge as an independent state until after the Napoleonic era.

During the initial stages of the struggle, William of Orange became the symbol of freedom. His main adversary was the Spanish King Philip II, who sent in the Duke of Alba with his formidable conquistadores to stop the rebellion.

Revolution depicts a power struggle with many facets. Each player represents one of the principal factions involved: the Catholics, Habsburgs, Nobility, Burghers and Reformers. Each faction has its particular goals, which are often partly common. Although factions may sometimes co-operate, they are not allies for long and easily turn on each other if the situation calls for this.

Historically, there were periods of open warfare and others of uneasy peace. The reforming factions gradually became more established, particularly in the north and along the coast. The once supreme Habsburg armies were slowly driven out of these areas through a series of siege battles. The defeat of the mighty Armada by a combined Dutch/English fleet in 1588 cost the Spaniards dearly. The Catholics were eventually allowed to retain some of their influence, while the local Nobility, initially catholic but with local sympathies, succeeded or failed according to their willingness to accept the changed circumstances.

This game is not a detailed military re-enactment of the Eighty Years’ War. It tries to capture the flavor of these interesting times in a much broader sense. It contains an element of warfare in the form of battles and sieges but the main theme is built on economic, religious and political control. The constantly shifting balance of power, caused by temporary alliances, makesRevolution an immensely challenging game, and not for the faint hearted. Clever and timely use of available resources, including those of foreign sympathizers and allies, is needed to achieve ultimate success.

~ Phalanx Games

 

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