Tag Archives: French

Bellum Gallicum II Review

Bellum Gallicum II

Bellum Gallicum II is a historical simulation which retraces the campaigns of Julius Caesar in Gaul from 58 to 51 BC, or from 696 to 703 ab Urbe Condita (since the foundation of the city), if one follows the Roman manner of counting years. One player takes the role of Julius Caesar and controls the Roman forces, their Gallic allies and German mercenaries. The other player takes on the interests of those Gallic tribes trying to defend their independence.

Bellum Gallicum contains several independent scenarios and a campaign game which covers the whole of the Gallic Wars.

Each of the 9 scenarios covers one annual campaign in its historical context.

The campaign game covers the whole of the Gallic Wars and runs as a series of annual campaigns. For each of these the Gallic player may choose to lead a revolt or to remain at peace. Victory is decided by the accumulation of campaigns won by the Roman player. The game may however stop at any moment if the conditions for a decisive victory are met.

The present version of Bellum Gallicum is a development of the original game which appeared in Casus Belli, issues number 68 and 69 (1992). It contains new developments of the rules, in particular in those chapters covering combat.

Contents:

  • One Rules and Scenarios booklet
  • One 41×59 cm map
  • 216 die-cut counters
  • 2 color Player-Aids

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
User Review:
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Borodino 1812 (A Video Review)

Borodino 1812

“Borodino was fought between the Army of Imperial Russia and Napoleon’s Grand Armee on September 7 1812. The battle ended with a French victory, but strategic defeat. Losses were terrible on both sides, but the Russians could replace theirs. One week after the battle Napoleon occupied an undefended Moscow, hoping to impose a peace, but after four weeks was forced to retreat home with calamitous results.

The historical battle involved wave after wave of frontal attacks by both sides, focusing on the Russian redoubts. However, the game will show all the options available to Napoleon and Kutuzov, including some not attempted historically. The French player has several possible lines of attack and the Russian player must try to anticipate and counter them all. The tactical interaction of Napoleonic infantry, cavalry and artillery is also emphasized, including cavalry charges and squares. This makes for exciting and tense gaming.

Movement and combat are resolved within areas. The game plays using the fast-paced Move-Move-Battle sequence seen in Hammer of the Scots and Shiloh. There are no cards involved; players activate leaders to command brigades of the same division of the same corps. Game time is 3-4 hours.”

~Columbia

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
User Review:
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Blood on the Alma (A Video Review)

Scheduled for Line of Fire magazine # 13, “Blood on the Alma” is a 2-3 player game recreating the 1854 Battle of the Alma River at the brigade level. Each unit is represented by a stack of step counters that modifies attack strength. Each army plays differently– the French have a more traditional sequence of play, their allies the British are activated by chit pull, and the outnumbered Russians must contend with morale checks while dealing with phases that are scattered throughout allied phases. The Russians have a terrain advantage which they historically squandered; the allies possessed a technological advantage in the Minie Rifle, but due to poor communication, it was not used by the British until late in the battle, when it turned the tide decisively. Combat is resolved by comparing modifiers to defense rolls, and the type of attacking unit determines the available outcomes. A number of factors, including victory for each side, are tied to and fluctuate with a single track, creating a sense of momentum and narrative.

~ Lock N’ Load Games

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
User Review:
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Swords of Sovereignty (A Video Review)

 

 

It covers two of the most important battles of the XIIIth Century, Bouvines 1214 and Worringen 1288, which are, respectively, the 33rd and 34th battles in the series. Bouvines is a new edition, much expanded, with new map, counters, and scenario specific rules of the game published in 2002 in Vae Victis #45.

The game includes:
– 216 counters
– 2 A3 maps
– One rules booklet
– One scenarios booklet with historical notes
– One player aid

Battles:
– Bouvines, 27 July 1214 (Phlippe II Auguste, King of France vs. Emperor Otton IV of Brunswick)
– Worringen, 5 June 1288 (John, duke of Brabant vs. Siegfried, Archibishop of Köln)
The game features one historical scenario and one “what if?” scenario per battle

~ Vae Victis

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
User Review:
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Raid on Bruneval (A Video Review)

Raid sur Bruneval 1942 – Raid on Bruneval 1942 – (Operation Biting) is a solitary tactical game that appeared in the French Vae Victis magazine #104 (special game edition). It simulates the Raid of British paratroopers under Major Frost’s command to capture a german radar near Bruneval (northwestern France) during the night of february 27th 1942. During this operation, the british dropped by parachute must capture the radar, one or two german operators, destroy the manor and finally embark all in the waiting Landing Craft Assaults.

The game is edited under ziplock and contains a A3-size map depicting Bruneval surroundings at night (scale at 1/25000), 108 counters (the 3 formation of British paratroopers Drake, Nelson and Rodney ; german coastal defense, luftwaffe guards, MGs, pill-boxes and part of 685th infantry regiment reinforcements ; activation and other markers). One typical counter unit represents around 10 men. The rules are included in a separate 15 pages A5-sized booklet.

The duration of the game is 13 turns from 0:15 et 03:15 am. The player plays the British side first each turn and then the activated german units fight, move and get reinforcements in this respective order. Except for the coastal defenses, the german units are not represented on the map at the beginning. Instead, several randomly selected activation markers are deployed in specific areas of the map. The combination of proximity to British units and alert level may trigger an activation marker that may hide from 0 to 4 german units. These activated units may then fight and move. German move is dictated by closest (in PM) and largest enemy stack or German stack. Combat is resolved by comparing the strength of both adjacent stacks modified by the presence of an officer, the terrain modifier and 1D6. Largest score inflicts one step loss to the other.
The British must score at least 10 victory points to get a marginal victory. More than 20 is a decisive victory. The historical score is 24 VP.

~ Vae Victis

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
User Review:
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)