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D-Day The American Beaches Review

D day

Utah and Omaha: The American Beaches are the third and fourth games in Paul Koenig’s D-Day series of five titles covering the first three nail-biting days (June 6 – 8, 1944) of Allied landings in France to liberate Europe during World War 2. Using fluid and dynamic systems for integrating the fierce combat and rapid movements of the companies and battalions contesting the beaches, cliffs, swamps and bocage bordering the rough North Sea coast, players will find the easy rules to offer rich puzzles and surprising opportunities on the cross-map march to victory.

On the two western beachheads, the Americans faced problems galore and some of the worst terrain encountered by the Allies. It seemed that Murphy’s Law was in full effect: “Everything that can go wrong will go wrong – and at the worst possible moment.” Yet despite widely scattered air drops, confusion and stiff German resistance, an American victory was won and the beaches secured. However, the cost in lives of this close-fought campaign will see it always remembered as “Bloody Omaha.”

Game Components:
• Two complete games!
• One 4-page, color Standard Rules booklet
• 80 color, 2-sided die-cut 1/2” mounted pieces
• 28 round 5/8” counters
• Two 11” x 17” color game maps with tables
• Illustrated Examples of Play, Exclusive and Optional Game Rules
• Part of a 5 game Paul Koenig’s D-Day series!

Scale: Each unit is 1 company to regiment, each hex is 1 kilometer, and each turn is about 4.5 hours.

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Sign of the Pagan Review


Sign of the Pagan from Richard Berg portrays the most famous battle of one of history’s most feared figures – Attila the Hun. It is considered by some to be the battle that saved Western Europe from the Huns and, for the most part, put an end to Attila’s wide-sweeping drives for loot.

The Battle of the Catalaunian Fields was fought as the age of the Roman West faded away and the Dark Ages began. As Attila’s Huns and their Germanic barbarian allies moved into Western Europe, leaving a trail of pillage and destruction behind and threats of more violence to come, the remnants of the Western Roman Empire joined with their former enemies, the mighty Visigoth tribe, to stop the deadly invasion.

The two coalitions squared off in battle in the summer of 451 A.D. in what is now central France. The result entered both history and mythic folklore, as one of the last armies of the Roman Empire stood in common cause with their bitter Gothic rivals to defend their lands and their peoples from the marauding terror of the Huns.

Game Data:

Complexity: 4 on a 9 scale
Solitaire Suitability: 6 on a 9 scale

What’s In The Box?:

• One 20-page full color Rules booklet
• Two 11” x 17” paper game maps
• 96 counters
• 16 Opportunity cards
• One player aid
• One ten-sided die
• One bright red, 9 1/4″ x 5 7/8″ Standard cardboard VPG game box
• One beautiful box cover sleeve
• One “Wipes-A-Lot” napkin
• One charcoal desiccant packet

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Glory’s End & When Eagles Fight (2014 ed) Review


1914: Glory’s End

Before the award-winning World War I designs Paths of Glory and The Great War In Europe, Deluxe Edition, designer Ted S. Raicer had revived interest in gaming the Great War with a series of WWI campaign games for the late lamented Command magazine. GMT is proud to present a set of revised boxed editions of these classic “players-games”.

In August 1914, Imperial Germany gambled its future on a rapid conquest of France, designed to free up the German army within six weeks to face the Russian steamroller of France’s Tsarist ally on the eastern front. Seven German armies deployed opposite five French armies, the army of “plucky little Belgium”, and the “Old Contemptibles” of the British Expeditionary Force in a series of battles that turned August and September 1914 into the bloodiest months of the entire war.

1914: Glory’s End covers the first three months of the Great War on the western front, from the Guns of August to First Ypres. This oft-gamed campaign receives a unique treatment, emphasizing playability without compromising on historical feel. Units are mostly corps of four steps (two counters per unit), along with a few especially strong (or weak) brigades and divisions, along with counters for the feared German Krupp and Skoda guns. The corps level Order of Battle accurately reflects the operational doctrine of the campaign, while also limiting the number of counters on the map to an easy-to-manage level.

The game scale is 9.5 miles per hex and three days per turn. The campaign game runs a full 30 turns, but the new edition will include not only a previously published mini-scenario on the Battle of the Marne, but a short ten turn campaign scenario covering the decisive opening weeks of the war. In addition the campaign games can be played in historical or free set-up versions.

1914: Glory’s End uses an Igo-Hugo system with two types of combat to demonstrate the tactical realities of the campaign: Prepared Combat and March Combat. Prepared Combat allows you to bring all your adjacent units to bear against a defending hex, but only with units that don’t move. This gives the defender time to reinforce, retreat, or pre-empt your combat with his own attack. To avoid this, you can “attack off the march” during your movement, but March Combat may only be delivered by a single stack at a time, limiting the force you can bring to bear. Furthermore, March Combat cannot be used against entrenched enemy units.

The coming of trench warfare is reflected by a unique Entrenchment rule: starting on turn 10 players may entrench one or two hexes per turn, PLUS any hexes adjacent to enemy trenches. The result is that trenches appear first as a tactical consideration, but then turn into a strategic problem as they spread with ever-increasing rapidity along the front.

1914: Glory’s End manages to cover all the important characteristics of the campaign (with rules for forts, cavalry, command and control breakdowns, supply, strategic rail movement, Allied sea movement, German forced marching, Plan XVII, Paris in Danger! and more) while remaining easy to play. The new GMT version will of course incorporate all errata from the original edition, but adds updated artwork, a corrected historical campaign Order of Battle, additional scenarios, and a tweaked set of rules.

When Eagles Fight

Before the award-winning World War I designs Paths of Glory and The Great War In Europe, Deluxe Edition, designer Ted S. Raicer had revived interest in gaming the Great War with a series of WWI campaign games for the late lamented Command magazine. GMT is proud to present a set of revised boxed editions of these classic “players-games”.

Winner of the Charles S. Roberts award for best pre-WWII boardgame, When Eagles Fight covers the eastern front in World War I, the last war of Tsarist Russia, Habsburg Austria, and Imperial Germany. From 1914 to 1917 the armies of the Tsar battled from the Carpathians to the Baltic against the outnumbered but logistically superior German army and the badly-led multi-ethnic forces of Austria-Hungary (the Central Powers). Though repeatedly inflicting massive defeats on the Habsburg armies, the Russians were ultimately undone by the skill and firepower of the German army and the collapsing political structure of the Tsarist autocracy. By March 1917 the 300 year-old Romanov dynasty was no more, and the stage was set for the coming of Lenin and the Bolsheviks. But the empire of the Habsburgs was left mortally wounded, and the Kaiser’s Germany would meet its own doom less than two years later on the battlefields of the western front.

When Eagles Fight recreates this titanic struggle from the initial clashes at Tannenberg and in Galicia to the revolution that brought down Tsar Nicholas II. The large-hex map covers the eastern front of the Great War from the northern tip of Romania to Petrograd, and from Berlin to Smolensk at a scale of 25 miles to the hex. Turns represent one or two months, and combat units range from division to (mostly) corps.

When Eagles Fight has a set of low-complexity rules, without sacrificing the historical elements of this unique theater of the Great War. The combat results table is bloody and attritional, but allows for breakthroughs with the right tactics or artillery support. The greater operational skills of the German army is shown in the use of the OberOst HQ, which allows additional attacks on a select part of the front. The Russian supreme headquarters, Stavka, in turn has the ability to concentrate their limited supplies to overcome logistical shortages. And the surprise tactics of the Brusilov Offensive can allow a late game victory over the Austrians.

Other rules cover the slow pace of Russian mobilization, Austrian Lock-Step Planning in the opening days of the war, German heavy artillery, fortifications, Russian Guards forces, Cavalry Retreats, and the effects of events on other fronts.

But the new edition of When Eagles Fight is more than just a reprint of the original version. The Random Events Table has been exchanged for a system of random events chits allowing for more events. The effects if the Germans do not launch a Verdun offensive in France-which sometimes threw off the balance of the original design- have been revised. Changes in the stacking rules after 1914 more accurately reflect the effect of trenches on the course of the campaigns. And the map now contains the rail lines removed by Command from the first edition. The game also includes a short alternative-history scenario in which the bulk of the German army goes east rather than west in August 1914.

These changes make this an improved edition of an already award-winning design. Tense, historical, and just plain fun, When Eagles Fight is a game that belongs in the collection of everyone with an interest in the Great War!

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Roads to Moscow Review

Roads To Moscow

Roads to Moscow is a two-player game depicting battles in the Soviet Union during the drive on Moscow in October 1941. The two separate battles shown in this game are named for the main objective city on each map, Mozhaysk to the west of Moscow, and Mtsensk to the south. Perhaps the most dramatic of the many desperate battles fought in front of Moscow, these two battles combined all the elements of the great struggle. The Germans have an excellent fighting machine but are short on fuel and time. They must capture their objectives on a tight schedule or snow and mud will end their offensive. The Soviets are down to the rearward remnants of their once immense armies. If the Soviets can avoid being encircled by the fast moving German forces, high quality reinforcements from the Far East may finally allow them to stop the German advance.

Historically, the Soviets stood fast at Mozhaysk, fighting heavily even on the old Napoleonic battlefield of Borodino. Like Napoleon, the Germans eventually took the field, but at great cost in time and manpower. Near Mtsensk Guderian’s Panzer spearhead advancing north from Orel was ambushed by the Soviets thereby disrupting the German timetable. This gave the Soviet 6th Guards Rifle Division time to dig-in on the heights above Mtsensk thereby barring the way to Tula and Moscow.

Roads to Moscow uses the same mechanics found in the acclaimed Roads to Leningrad game, featuring a chit draw for activation of formations. Both players quickly learn how to use their motorized units effectively for overruns, combined arms, and movement of reserves. The game includes special rules for Soviet rocket artillery, NKVD, and self-propelled gun units, and fuel supply shortages, and much more, all without overwhelming play of the game.

Three sheets 5/8″ counters (528 total)
One 22″ x 34″ Mapsheet (front & back printed)
4 Player Aid set-up cards
1 Charts & Tables card
Rule book
Play book
1 ten-sided die

DESIGNER: Vance von Borries
DEVELOPER: Mark Guttag
ART DIRECTOR: Rodger B. MacGowan
MAP & COUNTER ART: Charles Kibler

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Obbedisco! (Video Review)


The campaign of Bezzeca was a daring mountain warfare campaign, waged by Italian general Giuseppe Garibaldi.
He led his group of volunteers, the ” Corpo Volontari Italiani,” against Austrian General Kuhn’s forces in Trentino.
Garibaldi’s Red Shirts were stopped only by the end of the hostilities between the two states, and the General’s famous reply to the King’s telegram ordering the immediate end to military operations, a terse and concise “Obbedisco” (I obey).
This operational level game uses a Chit drawing activation method to create uncertainty in initiative and a combat system that stresses fatigue over real casualties. Obbedisco! include variable movement of units, leader initiatives, morale, force march, fortifications, supply, etc.

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